Different Kinds of Turf for Australian Weather

Turf is just grass for most Australians, no more, no less. But, for professionals in the field of gardening or those who are extra attentive to their yards, lawns are more than large patches of green.

The specific type of grass you choose for your lawn is not just a simple decision you have to make. You have to consider a lot of things, one of which is the weather according to one of the top turf supplier in Sydney. Below is an overview of the different kinds of lawn for Australian weather and what sets them apart from each.

Buffalo Grass

Buffalo grass is infamous for being annoyingly scratchy and irritating. However, it has become a popular option for the past few years with the rise of the so-called Soft Leaf Buffalo types of grass. These include Matilda and Sir Walter Buffalo that make fort soft and lush lawns when maintained properly. Buffalo grass thrives well in winter and summer and can handle the extremes brought by different times of the year.

Kikuyu Grass

With its name inspired by Kenya’s most heavily populated ethnic group, Kikuyu grass is often considered as among the more vigorous or durable grasses. This also happens to be the most economical. Kikuyu grass loves warmer climate, thriving in full sun that makes it an ideal choice for Australian homes. The main concern with this grass is its fast-growing nature, it means that this could become invasive and require frequent mowing during warmer months of the year. You need to take extra care to prevent it from creeping out of your lawn to spread in other parts of your yard or cross to your neighbor’s yard.

Couch Grass

Couch grass is always a popular type of turf with several equally popular sub-types. This is a cheaper and easy-going grass that makes this perfect if you want to have a great-looking lawn once treated properly. This can hold up against wear and tear that has the capacity to repair itself quickly because of the durable underground runners. Couch grass stays fairly vibrant throughout every season. But, extra care must be taken during warmer months as it requires regular mowing. During colder months, couch grass must be fertilized and nourished. Failure to do so will make it unsightly and patchy.

Tall Fescue

This is a famous choice for those instant lawns wherein pre-grown grass is being rolled out on top of pre-existing grass or soil. This is an unbelievably indiscriminate kind of grass as it is equally happy in both shade and sun. It can also adapt to different climates and soil conditions. But, the cherry on top is that this grass doesn’t have any runners. It means that this cannot invade your neighbor’s yard or nearby garden beds.

Zoysia Grass

Historically speaking, Zoysia grass is a less popular type of grass in Australia but it is now starting to gain significant recognition as a viable and attractive choice for lawns. It is famous for its incredible softness without the chances of scratching or irritating the skin. Its growth is also amazingly slow that makes it attractive for people who are not big fans of mowing. This turf does well all-year-round but is slightly more prone to browning during drought.

Evolution of Roofing Panels

Roofing panels today are available in all shapes, sizes, colours, and materials. Although asphalt shingles have become staples in most locales, elegant and classy ceramic tiles are also starting to rise in popularity. Durable, decorative, and lightweight metal roofs are also commonly used and they are still the number one choice today. But, how did all these choices for roofing panels came to existence in the first place?

Roofing has an interestingly long history that paved the way for the varied selection of styles and material choices of roofing panels. Take a quick look at this history:

Roofing Materials during Early Civilizations

It was easy to imagine our ancestors to sleep outdoors under the starlit sky or inside caves to stay protected from the elements. But, pieces of evidence were discovered proving that they already used roofs made from various substances such as wood, rocks, clay, and animal parts. Their options were generally limited to things naturally found in the environment. For instance, in tropical places, palm fronds were lightweight and practical choices that are still used to this day. Straw and mud roofs were often used in most parts of ancient Africa. Wood was an option, too. This was used with another material such as woven fibres or mud placed to fill in gaps.

Thatched and Tile Roofs

It was reported that due to the advanced architectural techniques in China, clay tiles were used in the country since 3,000 BC. It was during ancient Roman and Greek civilizations when tiles rose to popularity in Europe.

Locally available wooden or slate tiles were preferred in Northern Europe. Thatch became popular in Britain in 735 AD and was also used in other equatorial countries.

Baked clay was used for roofs in Southern Europe that resulted in the signature terracotta look of Mediterranean and Spanish architecture. During the early 1900s, red-painted concrete tiles were used as cheaper alternatives. Tiles then spread other countries as the colours and style expanded, with homeowners discovering their weather-resistant qualities and durability.

It was during the 1920s when Americans developed asphalt shingles. Asphalt is a mixture of a base of fibreglass or cellulose with granules and sealed with polymer-modified bitumen and resins. Inexpensive and easy to install and manufacture, asphalt shingles soon became a staple in most American homes.

Metal Roofing Panels

There is a good reason why metal roofing panels have long been used. They are extremely durable, not to mention that these can also be bent to suit the required shape. However, metal roofing panels used to be very expensive. Only wealthy people and important structures were able to afford them.

Modern Roofing – An Interesting Journey of Changes and Transformation

The modern materials used for roofing panels inherit the past’s interesting legacy as they combine the best elements of what worked for hundreds of years together with the latest trends and technology of modern times. Although the type of insulated roofing panels used today remain to be influenced by numerous factors such as cultural preferences, availability of local materials, and local climate, buyers now have more options to choose from.